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Author Topic: Human Tactics, a Guide  (Read 63654 times)
Markus

Loves Stampedes a little too much

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« on: January 10, 2011, 01:20:11 PM »

Group Strategy

All group techniques have essentially three goals: Speed, Stealth, and Support. Speed is vital in achieving mission objectives, in stunning single zombies, in fleeing zombie attacks, and in breaking sieges. Stealth is important to hunting zombies in early game, in obtaining intelligence on the hordes whereabouts, and in surviving the late game. Support is key for defending points, for breaking sieges, and in succeeding in missions. Yet, each of the three S's directly cuts away from the others.



Single-Man Strategy


Overview

A one man group, if performed well, is able to be both the fastest and stealthiest form of human unit. However, lack of support and synchronization with other humans means that every action must be executed perfectly. Don't check every cranny? You're dead. Run out of ammo at the wrong time? You're dead. Trip? You're dead. There is no support, no backup, no safety at all. One human alone is primally vulnerable.


Proper Use

Considering the large disadvantages of Single-Man movement in regards to finding hidden zombies and openly combatting groups of zombies, single-man movement is only recommended for late-game survivalism. In early game lurking zombies are more likely to pick you off, and in mid game the lack of ability to combat zombie groups cripples both mission ability and survivability.


Equipment

Load outs for a lone human should almost always be of the Scout build. A light, quiet and high capacity blaster is key. Range and rate of fire can be sacrificed if need be. Barricades, Alpha troopers, Mavericks, and Recons are all highly recommended as primary weapons. With adequate modification Stampedes, longshots, raiders, and deploys may work for a one man group. Recommended mods are minimization, dead space foaming, clip system modification, plunger seal replacement, and brass barreling. Other mods which may work include integration of other guns, plunger shortening, and spring and battery replacement may work. In particular, AR removal is a difficult choice. It may add significant range, but also increases the noise of firing. Padding the plunger head usually helps, but a fully silent blaster is impossible.


Encounters

Encounter strategy for a single human should be focused on avoiding as many fights as possible. The risk of death is massive, and each encounter increases this risk. Only encounters necessary to stay alive, maintain a daily routine and achieve vital missions should be actively engaged in.



Small Group Strategy


Two to Five

Small group tactics consist of groups of two to five. Anything above that can be considered a large squad. The advantages and disadvantages of each size are notable, with two man groups providing a solid and less death prone stealth team, and five man groups being a more mobile and stealthy version of the standard combat squad. In addition, small groups are by far the most customizable groups. Numbers, loadouts, tactical goals, and strategy can all be tailored to specific groups.

From a planning standpoint, it's a good idea to think of the two man group and the five man group for examples of how to strategize for small groups, and work from there. The two man group is similar to single man group with a few key differences, and a five man group is similar to a squad of smaller size and increased specialization.


Two Man Overview

A two man group is a very useful group for silent spying operations, as well as ambushes on small zombie groups, and emergency achievement of objectives. In terms of useful application of a two man operation, the key is to understand that a two man group is quick and mobile, but by no means guarantees the success of any operation. With two men there are double the amount of eyes, and one person to cover the other during reloading, jams, hydration breaks, and any other incapacitation. Speed and Stealth aren't severely hampered assuming that both members of the group are relatively fast, but if one person fails, both fail.

Proper Use
For quick success in zombie heavy areas the two man group is a vital element, but survivability is low in this form of group. There is still significant risk of lone zombies attacking. As such, only targets of value should be intentionally encountered. Stealth is still key. Combat should only be engaged with significant likelihood of success.

Loadouts
Loadouts have a much greater potential for customization in a two man group. Considering that stealth and mobility must still be focused on, no fully Heavy Weapons or Ranger loadout will be very effective. However, some increased firepower is still achievable. Consider packing additional clips and darts, and packing more powerful weaponry. Longshots, Stampedes, and Raiders may be used without very heavy modification without worrying about compromising safety, and dual wielding may be experimented in. That said, finding an ideal balance between speed, stealth, and firepower is vital. Using one man group weapons may be useful, or using larger firepower. The Scout class is still highly recommended, but transitional classes like the Assault and Sharpshooter may also be useful.


Five Man Overview
Five man groups are the most mobile group that is entirely combat ready for moderate-scale horde encounters. With well enough trained players it can reach close to the mobility of a two man group, and give sustained and reliable firepower. The key to speed is avoiding taking breaks as much as possible, but this may reduce effectiveness of individual players. Additionally, stealth is hurt by each man, and moreso by talking between players as a whole. That said, there is greatly reduced risk of total group wipe, and even with one or two player casualties a five man group is still able to achieve missions.

Proper Use
Long term survival and mission completion with high success in hotly contested areas relies almost entirely on a five man group. The combination of firepower, organization, and mobility allows this type of group to take out moderately sized hordes and still quickly complete goals. For as long as mission completion is feasible, five man groups will be vital to missions which require both mobility and combat reliability. Not to mention that well organized five-mans can combine and break on the fly, allowing for larger groups to be formed quickly. This makes large stand up battles and siege breaking much more easy to organize.

Loadouts
Five man loadouts can have massive variety. Heavies should almost always be present in a five man group, and Rangers or 'Naders provide useful services, especially in specific tactical situations. That said, every person should keep at least a mild Scout influence in their loadout, both to increase mobility and to have increased one man survival in case of group failure.




Classes

Within human play, there are an infinite number of potential loadouts. There are upwards of a hundred blasters, each with at least two mods and a very large amount of integration possibilities, not to mention the possibilities given by socks (and various sock delivery systems), poppers, blowguns and other custom equipment. Even without adding in modified tac rail tools, and treating modification as a linear progression, there are still hundreds of thousands of two blaster loadouts. Given the impossibility of listing every single loadout, Classes are a tool used to understand and apply loadouts to  specialized roles with specific tactical goals. The four classes are Heavy, Ranger, Grenadier, and Scout. Heavies are specialists in high rate of fire blasters, generally used for large scale combat against hordes. Rangers are range and stealth focused players, they usually provide long range support against zombies and assassinate dangerous zombie targets. Scouts are fragile speedsters, usually with light weaponry focused more on mobility than damage. They are messengers, mission saviors, flankers, and excellent distractions. Grenadiers are a difficult class to pin down. They use a variety of specialized weapons, from socks, to throw packets of darts, to poppers, to shotgunned pneumatic blasters like the titan. In the simplest terms they are a class devoted to fighting the horde in innovative ways. What they lack in range and accuracy they make up for with firepower, mobility, and unorthodox tactics.



The Heavy


Overview

The Heavy is a vital class to large group survival, as well as both defense and offense. As a Heavy, three main goals should be considered: survival of humans as a whole, destruction of the horde, and completion of missions (particularly defense and escort missions). Considering these goals, the Heavy loadout should be optimized for one thing: Firepower. A Heavy should be able to provide high Rate of Fire and long sustained dart output, and optimizing for one or the other lends itself towards one of the two sub classes of heavy.


Proper Use

Heavies should never roll alone. Their lack of mobility and accuracy makes it very simple for a single lucky zombie to take them out. Even two and three man groups should only consider a Heavy after significant risk assessment. That said, in larger groups a Heavy is a lifesaver. The massive firepower a Heavy provides will save a large group from losing players in situations where it's impossible to run, or where fleeing will incur significant casualties. From this standpoint, Heavies should be used in mid to early game to improve survivability, complete missions, and keep day to day survival as high as possible. In mid to late game Heavies gradually become less vital. Mission success relies less on stand up battles, and the only important goal of a Heavy becomes siege breaking. Finally, in the tail end of the game with few to no survivors left, Heavies should shift towards one of the transitional classes, or abandon the Heavy class altogether.


Loadouts

Any Heavy weapon has two requirements: A large ammo reserve, and a quick reloading mechanism. A fully automatic blaster is preferable, but a pneumatic blaster with a fillable air reserve or a spring action blaster with slam fire will work decently. The Vulcan, Power Strike 48, and Stampede are ideal for a Heavy role, but with enough modification a Magstrike, Raider, Berserker, or Alpha Trooper can be useful as a Heavy. In terms of modification, AR removal and minimization are highly recommended. Additionally, battery replacement or clip combining are recommended, but each should be considered carefully depending on the specialization of the Heavy in question


Encounters

A Heavy has four things to keep in mind when engaging zombies: Horde size, remaining ammo, group size, and mission goals. A heavy should only consider engaging large hordes, in order to maximize the effectiveness of their fire. Remaining ammo is vital to zombie combat, and if other encounters are expected than ammo should be conserved (especially for blasters that use specialized darts). A Heavy in a small group should avoid combat when possible, as any casualties are that much more damaging, where one in a large group should consider temporarily breaking off to damage a horde, preferably with several other Humans. Most importantly, mission goals should be taken into consideration. Time constraints on things like escort missions, siege breaks, and point defense can dictate weather or not to fight visible zombies.


Subclasses

The Guard
The Guard, as a subclass of the Heavy, is devoted primarily towards defending a non moving or slow moving area against zombies for as long as possible. Firepower and mobility are sacrificed in lieu of the ability to maintain a steady stream of darts for massive amounts of time. A Raider, Vulcan or Stampede is ideal for this situation, with a Raider clip added to the Stampede or several combined chains for the Vulcan. Additionally, it may be wise with the Vulcan or Stampede to not over volt the blaster, in order to conserve ammo.

The Attacker
The Attacker is the second subclass of the Heavy. It sacrifices ammo capacity and efficiency for a boost in mobility and overall firepower. In terms of sheer damaging ability, it is unparalleled. The goal of an Attacker should always be to devastate the Horde as a whole. A minimized Stampede or Vulcan with a battery replacement is key to this role. Dual wielding is also a possibility.



The Ranger


Overview

Rangers provide a unique service to all humans: they kill zombies that have no chance of attacking back, and possibly even have no chance of seeing death coming. This job has two needs: To reliably make kills and to not be vulnerable to zombie attack. Further, these can be broken down into different elements of each need. Reliable kills require a good blaster or blowgun, a solid viewpoint, a clean shot, experience with the blaster, and the element of surprise. Safety for a Ranger requires stealth, distance, and supporting humans. With all of these requirements a Ranger is forced to make a difficult choice. They must choose between staying with the main human group and attacking distant zombies, or heading out alone to take on the horde from hidden vantage points. This question is a difficult one, and really depends on the Ranger in question. The sub classes of Ranger, and its support class, the spotter, are all focused on answering these questions.

Any player planning on rolling as a Ranger should keep one important caveat in mind: actual military style sniping will never be truly successful in a nerf setting. Blasters, bows, and blowguns all have limits on range and accuracy much greater than a real sniper rifle, and attempting to increase range beyond a certain point creates shots which are painful or injurious to players. Attempting to snipe like this is a serious violation of the DBAD rule, and can get some sniping weapons banned from the game (and getting an item banned by being a dick is a meta violation of the DBAD rule, and anything meta is assumed a violation of the DBAD rule, so you've already triple violated the DBAD rule, you dick). Singled Titans are not recommended at close ranges, especially considering the risk it has if it hits eyes or other sensitive areas, but if it's allows significant range advantages.


Proper Use

The Ranger is an almost universally useful class. It has applications in mission completion, siege breaking, zombie killing, group defense, and even late game survivalism. As long as a Ranger maintains good distance and stealth they are invaluable as both a spy and a killer of targets of valuable. The question isn't when to use a Ranger, but where. Clear view of zombies, hiding spaces, and escape routes are vital. As well as distance from the target sufficient to keep from being tagged in the short term. The only time a Ranger is at a significant disadvantage is in confined spaces. If your game allows inside play, consider avoiding Ranger play in those areas.


Loadouts

The Ranger loadout consists primarily of one very long range blaster, and an optional secondary. While the secondary will increase bulk and reduce mobility, added firepower and a second line of defense may prove useful if stealth fails. With that in mind, the primary weapon of a Ranger should focus mainly on range. Rate of fire is also a concern, especially when traveling in a squad or anticipating significant zombie resistance, but should fall below range on the list of priorities. Longshots, blowguns, and singled Titans are all possible Ranger primary weapons, and modification is a key element to being successful as a Ranger.


Encounters

Ideally, a Ranger should never actively encounter a zombie. All zombies should be stunned before even being able to find the Ranger. This is rarely true though. A Ranger, whenever firing, should consider three things before risking exposure to any number of undead.

  • Am I able to take out all visible zombies on my own?
  • If not, do I have enough back up to prevent myself from being tagged?
  • If this back up fails, do I have room to flee, escape, and fight my way to another safe zone or hiding place?

As any shot from a blaster is slow moving enough to give a straight line showing where the Ranger shot from, these are vital questions.


Subclasses

The Assassin
A Ranger focusing on range significantly over rate of fire, the Assassin rolls with as few people as possible. The goal of an Assassin is to take potshots at single zombies or the horde, to reduce numbers and remove targets of value (if possible, if you can aim well enough to hit man sized targets from your maximum range then you are most likely magic). Distance is key to survival with this loadout. An off brand dart bow or a clip system removed Longshot are good ideas for this loadout.

The Designated Marksman
As a Ranger built to run with a squad, the Designated Marksman is focused primarily on taking out horde members before the rest of his group can. As soon as a horde becomes visible, the Marksman should move to the front lines of his squad and take repeated shots against the horde, stopping only to make a gradual retreat into the center or back of his squad as the horde prepares to charge. A blowgun or modded longshot is a very good choice for this type of Ranger.

Support Class: The Spotter

The Spotter is a class designed specifically to roll with a Ranger. As a Spotter, the goal is to keep your Ranger alive and out of the way of zombies. This should be done through locating, distracting, and stunning nearby zombies. The middle part, distraction, is the key element here. As a Spotter, any found zombies must be kept chasing you, rather than searching for the Ranger. This is best accomplished performing short, skirmishing attacks against Hordes, or individual zombies. A Scout loadout, or a transitional loadout of at least part Scout, is recommended. Alpha Troopers, Barricades, Mavericks, Recons, and minimized Stampedes are all recommended for a Spotter.



The Scout

The Scout is the most mobile and versatile class. In spite of being purpose-built for speed, it has the greatest variety of uses in the game. Generally speaking it's also one of the cheapest and easiest classes to equip and play as, and it is key to many important player goals. A Scout serves as a literal scout, as well as a flanker, a zombie distraction, a messenger in lieu of walkies and cell phones, a mission completing powerhouse, and a skirmisher.

Any Scout should focus on mobility and stealth as key goals, with mobility being the primary one and stealth following close behind. Loadouts should be light, and preferably quiet, but slight sacrifice of either of these doesn't usually cripple a well trained Scout.


Proper Use

The Scout is, by and far, the most ubiquitous class in the game. If you can't find a useful application for a Scout, you're not doing it right. Any time speed, stealth, and efficiency are needed in getting from one place to another the Scout is the man to ask. Use well, and in bulk.


Loadouts

Recons, Deploys, Alpha Troopers, Barricades and Mavericks are all good stock blasters as a Scout. With enough modification, the Stampede may work as a Scout weapon, as well as the Barrel Break, Firefly, Doubleshot, and various others. Poppers and socks are highly recommended as secondaries and holdout weapons.


Encounters

As with most Scout things, encounters should be short, sweet, and to the point. Scout encounters always end one of three ways: Total zombie destruction, Scout death, or Scout fleeing. Good Scouts usually do the third, bad Scouts usually do the second. Any encounter that is avoidable should be avoided, any encounter that is necessary, either due to time or lack of stealth abilities, should focus on leaving, and fast. Ammo as a Scout is very limited, and running out isn't an option. Use ammo sparingly.

One key tactic to surviving and thriving in encounters involves herding zombies. When spotted, run for a short sprint before looking behind you. Clear as many of the zombies in the head of the pack as possible. Lather, rinse, repeat for as long as necessary to be able to flee effectively. This tactic eliminates the fastest zombies quickly, and eventually creates a horde of only slow moving undead, making it easy to escape.



The Grenadier

Grenadiers are weird. They use the greatest variety of weaponry and tactics, and their build tends to lean towards having hints of other classes in it. They have eclectic, and often contrasting styles of play. They don't really focus entirely on speed, stealth, or firepower. They don't really have any sort of purist form, having notes of Scout, Ranger, or Heavy, depending on the specific 'Nader involved. The only true thing that can be said about Grenadiers is that they love the unorthodox kill. Poppers, socks, Absolver Titans, and faux grenades made of hair-banded darts are among their loadouts. They kill where other classes could not, in numbers that other players could not.


Proper Use

Grenadiers are also tough to fit any one person to. The main question when picking Grenadier is "will this be fun?" Grenadiers are all about the insane. Sneaking onto the roof to lob socks and dart handfulls on the horde below, bouncing foam footballs off of walls to the lurkers you know are right past the corner, tricking a horde into chasing you only to have them activate the shotgunned stomp rocket hidden along the path, all of these are Grenadier tactics. Sanity is optional. Entertainment isn't.


Loadouts

Honestly, there is nothing to say here. Pick anything nonstandard. Go to the local hobbyshop. Mod the crap out of anything. Absolverize a Titan, integrate that into a Maverick, grab some darts, put those in rubberbands, stuff some more darts into party poppers, pick up a tennis ball slingshot, put socks in it, modify a stomp rocket to use nerf darts. Go insane, literally. Unorthodoxy is the key to playing an effective grenadier.


Subclasses
Note: Grenadier Subclasses are still experimental, and any assistance on proper Grenadier classification is welcome.

The Sock Ninja
The Sock Ninja is a scoutesque class, packing primarily socks, as well as sometimes packing poppers and a backup Maverick. It generally provides support against small groups of zombies with quick and accurate skirmishing strikes, and stealth is key to long term survival. Additionally, with the use of large slingshots or foxtail socks it can sometimes be a powerful ranged support class.

The Lobber
The Lobber primarily wields hair band grenades, using them as moderate range crowd killers. Possibly with a light blaster as a secondary. It is usually used to devastate the horde in close areas and when the horde formes crowds.



Transitional Classes

Transitional classes are the hybrids of the human loadout world. They take a partial emphasis on the main goals of each class and employ them into a loadout and combat doctrine. The Transitional Classes are as follows: Assault (Scout + Heavy), Bombadier (Scout + 'Nader), Sharpshooter (Scout + Ranger), Artillery (Heavy + 'Nader), Rifleman (Heavy + Ranger) and SWAT (Ranger + 'Nader). In terms of rarity, Artillery and Riflemen are the rarest, with SWAT and Sharpshooter following that, and with Assault and Bombadier being the most common Hybrids.

The Assault
The Assault is named after what it's born for: Assault. Overwhelming high speed violence is to the Assault as water is to fish. It sacrifices the majority of the Scouts stealth and a sometimes a part of its speed for a significant amount of the Heavies firepower. It would be more appropriate to call this a Scout-Attacker hybrid class, although theoretically a scout well versed in on the fly reloads and herding could pull off a Scout-Defender hybrid.

Loadouts keyed towards this class generally include overvolted electric blasters and electric pump added pneumatic blasters. Modified Vulcans, Stampedes, and Magstrikes are all possible weapons, and dual wielding is definitely an option.

Encounters should always be entered unless the Assault is low on ammo or very significantly outnumbered. Herding, as well as distraction techniques and mobile shooting are key to dealing as much damage as safely as possible to the horde. Humans with severe suicidal deviation are recommended for this class.

The Bombardier

The Bombardier is a class focusing entirely on using the lightest possible Grenadier weapons to deal as much damage as possible. Socks, Grenades, Poppers, and shotgunned pneumatic blasters are all potential constituants of the Bombardier class, and specialization into any of the Grenadier subclasses is possible.

Encounters, while less agressive than the Assault, should still be by no means conservative. Skirmishing and herding are vital elements of Bombardier strategy, and should focus on using the Grenadier style unorthodoxy of this build to sow chaos and confusion among zombie ranks.

The Sharpshooter

The Sharpshooter is the least inherently agressive of the Scout hybrids, as it combines with the very conservative Ranger build. In terms of loadout a Sharpshooter should employ an accurate, light, and relatively easy to reload blaster. Minimized Longshots and several off brand bows are very solid recommendations for this. Combat strategy consists of using ranged attacks to stun horde members, while fleeing and using speed to keep zombies at range.

Encounters should generally be avoided unless the horde is at range and the Sharpshooter has surplus ammo.

The Artillery

The Artillery is focused almost entirely on firepower, especially moderate range firepower focused on short bursts. Pneumatic blasters, especially Titans and Drain Blasters, that have been absolverized are the key component of Artillery loadouts. Artillery attacks should almost always be reserved for a massing horde, to ensure that darts deal as much damage as possible.

Encounters using the full force of an Artilleries strike should be reserved for hordes, but if the Artillery can carry a sidearm they should feel free to use that in smaller encounters.

The Rifleman

Riflemen are a rarity, as there are very few blasters which both combine range and rate of fire. That said, any blaster capable of these is a powerful combination. High rate of fire strikes against hordes of zombies allow for devastating damage to the horde. The increased range of a Ranger, combined with a Heavies firepower, allows for long distance damage to hordes and preventative efforts against hordes massing.

The Rifleman should focus almost exclusively on massing hordes, barring the need to fight for survival.

SWAT

SWAT players use a combination of distance reliant Ranger weapons and close in effective Grenadier sidearms to produce a class capable of dealing with both long and close range with effectiveness. Usually the Grenadier half of the loadout is used as holdout weaponry, specifically when being rushed or ambushed.

SWAT engagement is almost entirely reliant on player skill. A good Ranger with SWAT elements in their loadout will generally prefer range unless forced in close, while a skilled Grenadier will only take a few potshots before attempting grenade and sock use. The ideal SWAT will engage at range, herding for as long as possible to thin faster horde members, and then begin lobbing socks and grenades when in close.




Equipment

Writing a comprehensive guide to every piece of equipment and every possible modification would be impossible. That said, a guide on general equipment information, as well as on the basic types of modification, and links to as many effective and helpful guides as possible is very much possible to write. While this will be as exhaustive a guide as I can write, I make no guarantees that this is the guide to equipment.



Classification

All equipment falls into specific groups of items which must be effectively sorted to allow for both more effective understanding of every item and for more easy location of specific pieces of equipment. Hopefully this will give a basic summary of the classification in effect, and help both in listing and in searching through that list. Please post any and all questions and requests.


Combat Vs. Noncombat

Obviously the simplest layer of classification is Combat Vs. Noncombat, but there is some ambiguity as to weather or not any one specific item is a Combat item or a Noncombat one. To be clear, only items directly participating in the act of loading and firing a dart are considered Combat items. Anything else is noncombat. So, for example, clips, chains, and ammo boxes would all be combat weapons, where holsters, walkie talkies, and camel backs would all be noncombat. For things which have ambiguous purposes, like string tied to the Mavericks priming mechanism, there will be a listing in both sections.


Blaster Vs. Nonblaster

In the Combat section of the equipment listing, there is one simple division between Blaster and Nonblaster. Any item which was originally sold as a dart launching mechanism is considered a Blaster, but anything not sold as that would be considered Nonblaster. The exception here is bows. As there are both dart launching and non dart launching bows, they will be put in the Blaster section for ease of location


Blaster subclassification

Blasters can be classified by two different means: Brand and mechanism. Brands include nerf, buzz bee, air zone, and others. Mechanism refers to the underlying machinery of the blaster, and is therefore the most useful classification for modders. The two main mechanisms are spring and pneumatic. Below this, spring has both manual and electric, and pneumatic has manual, pre filled tank, and electric pump subclassifications.


Nonblaster subclassification

Nonblasters can be devised into many, many different groups. The main groups are  Converted Household Objects, PvC, Sock Based and Other. Given the variety of Nonblasters, more listing will be added as needed.


Noncombat subclassification

Noncombat equipment can be divided mainly by purpose. Noncombat groups include: Surveillance, Carrying, Communication, Transport, Food, and Medicine.

Modification


Basic Mods

AR removal
Almost all blasters have some form of Air Restrictor, a device designed to artificially limit the amount of force put on a dart. An AR removal is simply opening up the blaster and taking out this restrictor, which allows for immediately greater power, albeit at the risk of increased plunger wear and noise.
  • Useable on- Prettymuch everything
  • Things to consider- Ask yourself if you need stealth, and if you are willing to add padding to your plunger head if you're using a spring blaster. Think about if you've ever done a mod before, this is a good starting mod, but some of the more difficult blasters will make this one a headache. Consider the increased wear and tear for spring blasters.
  • Notable links-

Minimization
Minimization is the act of removing as much empty space as is possible to remove and still be able to fire the blaster accurately and easily. Almost every blaster has at least a bit of dead space, which allows minimization to occur. This reduces both the weight and the bulkiness of blasters.
  • Useable on- Prettymuch everything
  • Things to consider- Do you want your blaster this small? Will minimization put fragile parts at risk of damage? Are these pieces really unimportant?
  • Notable links-

Integration
Integration is another way to use dead space. Rather than simply cutting out the space, it is possible to put another complementary blaster into that area, allowing for multiple blasters and giving added range or firepower through a secondary gun. Unlike most mods, integration has two blasters participating: the integrator and the integratee. The integrator is the one put in, the integratee.
  • Useable on-Almost any blaster. The Longshot, Vulcan, and Stampede all make very solid integratees, while the Titan is by and far the most common integratee. Poppers, as well as many other blasters, may be used as integrators for the tactical rail.
  • Things to consider- Will you be able to fire this second blaster? Would the reduced bulk from a minimization be better? Is the integrator a good gun to combine with your integratee?
  • Notable links-

Deadspace filling
Even with minimization and integration it's often possible that certain vital areas of the blaster will be empty, and filled with only air. Putting foam, putty, or plumbers goop into these areas can help to quiet the blaster and sometimes prevent or reduce damage from dropping.
  • Useable on- Anything that has any space after minimization and integration.
  • Things to consider- What material are you using for filler? Is it a good material? Will it get in the way of vital parts?
  • Notable links-

Clip alteration
Every blaster can have some sort of clip system integrated into it, and the blasters with clips can have those clips altered or removed. Clip addition is generally used to increase firepower, where clip removal adds range in some high performance blasters.
  • Useable on- Anything
  • Things to consider- Does this clip work well for this blaster? Does this blaster need a clip?
  • Notable links-

Source Conversion
Any blaster has the potential to have its source altered, from a manual to an electric or from a spring to a pneumatic, or anything in between. Often the advantages of this alternate power source can be used to even out the flaws existing in a specific blaster system.
  • Useable on- Varies
  • Things to consider- How will the different source affect how the blaster is fired? Will it alter ranges? Accuracy? Capacity? Reload time?
  • Notable links-


Spring Exclusive Mods

Spring Replacement
Spring blasters are unique in that their shot power source is replaceable with a stronger model as long as that one fits. Double springing, power stocks, and other spring addition techniques are also spring replacement mods. The only downside to this mod is that the added strain on the internals, which can be compensated for.
  • Useable on-All spring blasters
  • Things to consider-Can the priming bar handle the spring? Can you handle the spring? Can the motor/battery handle the spring?
  • Notable links-

Plunger Head Padding
Padding the plunger head is a technique to prevent damage on the plunger head, and to silence the firing of the blaster as much as possible.
  • Useable on- All spring blasters
  • Things to consider- How much padding is needed to keep the plunger head safe? How much is needed to quiet it? Will excessive padding make it difficult to load and fire?
  • Notable links-


Pneumatic Exclusive Mods

Tank Replacement
Replacing a tank has several advantages for pneumatic blasters: it can increase capacity, add replaceable tanks, and often be used with more simple piping.
  • Useable on- All Pneumatic blasters
  • Things to consider- Is the new tank higher capacity? More durable? If it fails will it fail catastrophically? Is it replaceable?
  • Notable links-

Absolverization
Named after Absolver, this method of adding multiple barrels to create a dart shotgun is commonly used on Titans and Drain Blasters. It allows for massive amounts of dart output in one shot.
  • Useable on-Any singled Pneumatic Blaster
  • Things to consider-How much range do you want? How many darts launched? How many barrels? How many darts per barrel?
  • Notable links-

Singling
Commonly used on Titans to make high power blasters, singling can be dangerous, but is effective for creating very long range blasters.
  • Useable on- Any pneumatic blaster that shoots a larger dart
  • Things to consider- How strong are the pneumatics? Will this be dangerous?
  • Notable links-


Manual Exclusive Mods
 
Priming Handle/Pump Replacement
All manual blasters need some form of pump to pull back the spring or fill the air tank. Replacing this with a longer pump in air blasters allows for more air added per pump, and doing it with spring blasters can make an easier grip or change how priming occurs in the blaster.
  • Useable on- Most manual blasters
  • Things to consider- Will this pump replacement help? Will it make the draw heavier or lighter?
  • Notable links-


Electric Exclusive Mods

Battery Replacement
Replacing the standard batteries in a blaster with more powerful ones (particularly lithium or nickel metal hydrate) can increase rate of fire, as well as torque generated by the motor, allowing for heavier springs and stronger shots.
  • Useable on-Any electric blaster.
  • Things to consider-How much voltage can you add before the gun melts? Which part will fail first?
  • Notable links-

Motor Replacement
A new motor of the same dimensions as the one within your blaster may be difficult to find, but the advantage of a new motor is twofold: stronger springs may be added and larger batteries may be used, both without worrying about motor burnout.
  • Useable on- Any electric blaster
  • Things to consider- Are you sure this motor is a perfect fit? Will it add strain to the other parts of the blaster?
  • Notable links-



Blaster Listings (rough)



   Alpha-Trooper
   Manual, Spring, Slam fire
   The Alpha-Trooper is a newer Raideresque gun, and like most reshelled Recons it has severe limitations in terms of achievable range. However, the slam fire capacity it has gives a distinct advantage in terms of rate of fire. As a lighter, smaller version of the Raider with better stock ranges, the AT is both a good Scout blaster and has the ability to be a decent Heavy blaster. The 18 round clip it comes with is generally considered less flimsy than the Stampedes, and can actually be loaded with slightly more than 18 rounds. Even just for the clip it can be a worthwhile blaster to get.
      2 handed
      Ammo: Stock darts
      Range: 30-35 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/2 seconds
      Clip: Clip system, 18 round stock

      Mods
         
         AR removal, spring tightening
            Range now 40-55 ft, add Loud quality
         Power stocking
            Range now 55-70 ft. Add Increased Wear quality
         Deadspace padding
            Add Silent quality to the Alpha, or remove Loud quality.
      Ratings (stock)
         Scout=***
         Heavy=***
         Ranger=**
         Grenadier=**

      Ratings (36 round clip, all listed mods)
         Scout=****
         Heavy=***
         Ranger=***
         Grenadier=**

   Barrel Break
   Manual, Spring
   The Barrel Break is quite new, but has not felt the same level of amazement that the Stampede and Barricade have received. Its low capacity, coupled with a high price, strange reload cycle, and mod unfriendliness have left it almost untouched by the mod community. That said, it is very light, has a surprisingly good range both modded and unmodded.
   
   Barricade
   Automatic, Spring, Electric, Fixed Clip, Loud
   The only flywheel gun of the new generation of Nerf blasters, the Barricade has been well received for its very good accuracy and ammo conserving while still fast semi-auto firing. As a one handed blaster with very solid modularity the Barricade makes a decent sidearm for most classes, and is especially good as a main blaster for the Scout. However, the spinup for this blaster creates an incredibly noisy whine, which makes it difficult to use stealthily. That said, the ability to dual wield or go one handed, integration and modification capacity, lightness, and versatility of the Barricade are a force to be reckoned with.
      One Handed
Ammo: Stock darts
      Range: 20-30 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/second, 5 second spinup
      Clip: 10 rounds
      Mods
         Clip Integration
            Clip now clip system
         Battery Replacement
            Spinup now 2 seconds
         Trigger activated spinup
            Remove  Loud
      Ratings (Stock)
         Scout: ***
         Ranger: **
         Heavy: **
         Grenadier: **

      Ratings (18 round clip, all listed mods)
         Scout: *****
         Ranger: ***
         Heavy: ***
         Grenadier: **

   Berserker
   Manual, Spring, Integrated (Manual, Pneumatic), Fixed Clip, Uncomfortable
   The Berserker is generally a very polarizing blaster. It has less than average stock range, an uncomfortable grip, and awkward bulk, but it also has massive mod potential, solid rate of fire, and a secondary integrated blaster built in. For Scouts and Heavies, this blaster can be very useful if you get past its shape, and for Rangers a singled center shot can be very useful, assuming you can get it past your mods and you don’t mind a significant reload time. Either way, the two integrated blasters complement each other well for a versatile and powerful blaster.
      Two Handed
Ammo: Buzz Bee darts, rocket darts
      Range: 15-25 ft, for both main and integrated
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/4 seconds
      Clip: 30 round cylinder
      Mods
         AR removal, Barrel replacement
            Main blaster range now 35-45 ft
         Grip replacement
            Remove the Uncomfortable quality
         Center shotgunning
            Integrated range is now 30-45 ft
            Add the Shotgun quality to the integrated blaster
         Center singling
            Integrated range now 55-70 ft
            Add the Illegal quality to the integrated blaster
         Air-Spring fusion
            Remove the Integrated quality
            Remove the Spring quality
            Add the Spring-Pneumatic Fusion quality
            Range now 45-55 ft assuming AR & barrel mods
      Ratings (stock)
         Scout: ***
         Ranger: **
         Heavy: **
         Grenadier: **
      Ratings (Center shotgunning & basic mods)
         Scout: ****
         Ranger: **
         Heavy: ****
         Grenadier: **
      Ratings (Center singling & basic mods)
         Scout: ****
         Ranger: ****
         Heavy: ***
         Grenadier: **
      Ratings (Air-Spring fusion & basic mods)
         Scout: ****
         Ranger: ***
         Heavy: ***
         Grenadier: **

   Belt Blaster

   Big bad bow
   Manual, Spring, Clumsy reload
      Two Handed
      Ammo: Arrow darts
      Range: 15-30 ft
      Rate of Fire: 1 dart/10-15 seconds
      Clip: N/A
      Mods
         Deoderant clip
            Rate of fire now 1 dart/5 seconds
            Clip now 7 darts
         AR removal, breech replacement
            Ammo now stock darts
            Range now 45-60 ft
       Ratings
         Scout: **
         Heavy: **
         Ranger: *** to ****
         Grenadier: **

   Deploy

   Doubleshot

   Furyfire

   Hunter

   Longshot
   Manual, Spring
   In terms of combining range, modification ability, and capacity, the Longshot has been publically adored by Rangers for a long time. While it has only moderate range and accuracy stock, it has astounding modification potential. Especially among experienced players, the Longshot is used as a platform for integration of other blasters.
   2 Handed
   Ammo: Stock darts
   Range:
   Rate of fire:
   Clip: Clip system clip, 6 darts stock
   
   Longstrike

   Magstrike
   Pump fed, Automatic Pneumatic, Fillable reserve, Fragile
The Magstrike is both a relatively small and light blaster and one of the fastest firing automatic blasters in the game. In spite of this, it has seen a wane in popularity as time has gone by. The main cause of this is the rise of other automatic blasters that don’t require pump filling, as well as the fragility and difficulty in modding the Magstrike. Still, more attention should be payed to the high speed, lightness, and mod potential this blaster has.
      1-2 Handed
Ammo: Stock darts
      Range: 20-30 ft
      Rate of Fire: 2-6 darts/second
      Clip: 10 dart custom clip
      Mods
         Asdf
      Rating (stock)
         Scout: ***
         Heavy: ***
         Ranger: **
         Grenadier: **
      Rating (Modded)

   Maverick
   Manual, Spring, Fixed clip
      1-2 Handed
Ammo: Stock darts
      Range: 10-25 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/4 seconds
      Clip: 6 dart cylinder
      Mods
         Asdf
      Rating (stock)
         Scout: ***
         Heavy: **
         Ranger: **
         Grenadier: **

   Monkey Buisiness Crossbow
   Manual, Spring
      2 Handed
Ammo: Custom Bolts
      Range: 80-100 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/10 seconds
      Clip: N/A
      Mods
         Asdf
      Ratings
         Scout: ***
         Heavy: *
         Ranger: *****
         Grenadier: ***

   Monkey Buisiness Compound bow
   Manual, Spring, Ricochet, Clumsy Reload
   The monkey business Compound bow, though neither brand name nor particularly fancy, is an underrated performer for both Rangers and Grenadiers. It has massive range, an arcing shot for shooting over obstacles, and the interesting ability to bounce off of walls. These traits easily make up for its loud retort after firing and strange reload, but it will never be effective at high rates of fire, or particularly useful for running players.
      2 Handed
Ammo: Custom arrows
      Range: 75-90 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/10 seconds
      Clip: N/A
      Mods
         N/A
      Ratings
         Scout: **
         Heavy: *
         Ranger: *****
         Grenadier: ****

   Nitefinder

   NXT Generation Crossbow
   Manual, Spring, Silent
   As far as off-brand bows and crossbows go, the NXT Generation one is by and far the most realistic. It has a significantly quieter release than either of the Monkey Buisiness bows surgical tubing, and it primes without any confusing hooks or pulleys. With its stock darts it shoots quite far and accurately, as well as having a silent mechanism making it great for assassinations. With Nerf whistlers, though, it has the ability to fire much longer ranges, albeit with a risk of misfire, and can be loaded with several darts for a shotgun like effect. This blaster is very solid for Rangers, as well as working as a Scouts main weapon if shotgunned.
      2 Handed
Ammo: NXT generation darts
      Range: 35-50 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/4 seconds
      Clip: N/A
      Mods:
         Dart Replacement
            Change Ammo to stock darts
            Add Shotgun quality
            Add Misfiring quality
      Ratings (Stock):
         Scout: **
         Heavy: *
         Ranger: *****
         Grenadier: **
      Ratings (Modded):
         Scout

   Raider
   Manual, Spring, Slam fire, Clip system
      2 Handed
      Ammo: Stock darts
      Range: 20-25 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/2 seconds
      Clip: Clip system, 36 round clip stock
      Mods
         Asdf
      Ratings
         Scout: ***
         Ranger: ***
         Heavy: ***
         Grenadier: **
   Rapidfire 20

   Rapidfire Tek

   Recon

   Specter

   Stampede
   Automatic, Electric, Spring, Fixed RoF, Heavy
      
   Tec 3
   Tec 4
   Tec 6
   Tec 10

   Titan
   Pneumatic, Manual, Pump filled
   The Titan is one of the few blasters that can be genuinely described as useless stock. It launches an incredibly slow moving dart a sadly short distance, and can’t even be fired at anything more than a 45-degree angle.  The Titan is a diamond in the rough though. It has vast amounts of deadspace that can be removed, as well as the ability to integrate the main air cannon

   Tommy 20
   Spring, Automatic, Battery powered
   The Tommy twenty has cheap price, solid rate of fire, and relative lightness for electric blasters.

   Vulcan
   Automatic, Electric, Spring, Fixed RoF, Bulky, Heavy
   The first electric blaster nerf released, the Vulcan is generally considered one of the most power guns in terms of raw dart output and capacity. The main drawback to this is the greatly increased weight of the blaster. Vulcans are cripplingly heavy, and often inconvenient to carry, even two handed. The ability to stitch chains together still gives the Vulcan the highest capacity of any one blaster though, which makes it a vital siege and holdout weapon.   
      1-2 Handed
      Ammo: Stock darts
      Range: 20-30 ft
      Rate of fire: 1 dart/second
      Clip: 25 dart chain
      Mods
         Chain stitching
            Add 25 additional darts to the chain
         Minimization
            Remove the Bulky quality
         Battery Replacement
            Remove the Heavy quality
            Rate of fire now 2 darts/second
      Ratings (stock)
         Scout: *
         Heavy: ****
         Ranger: **
         Grenadier: **
            
      Ratings (all listed mods)
         Scout: **
         Heavy: *****
         Ranger: **
         Grenadier: **



*Coming Soon: Less ugly looking equipment guides, Mission guides, Large group guides, Zombie tactic studies, Situational guides, Squad Equipment formatting and much, much more!*
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 12:06:57 PM by Markus » Logged

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OH DEAR GOD MY LOINS!
Markus

Loves Stampedes a little too much

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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2011, 01:20:35 PM »

Reserved, in case there's a character limit to posts.
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The_Kommandant


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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 02:21:17 PM »

Not to nitpick, but a singled Titan should never be used on a person. The only safe way is to Absolve it. Also, you might want to mention the Marshmallow Blaster in the grenadier section, as it is the cheapest way to make a surprisingly effective shotgun.
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Primary: Overkill-Stampede w/Integrated Swarmfire and Double Drums
Sidearms: Barricade x2, Spectre
Ammo:35-Double Drum, 18-Mag x6
mcknightchris
* Game Organizer


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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2011, 02:56:41 PM »

I love the Grenadier description. Great work on this one.
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Semi-retired from HvZ due to leaving TAMU. Hopefully I can make it to some missions and invitationals.

Squad: CDC
Rank: Lieutenant

Insanity is just another state of mind... lol
skullface1818

The Tallahassee nerf mogul

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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2011, 03:29:44 PM »

kudos for writing this thing up.

I'm going to post this one up on our face book page ^___^
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Name: Aaron S. Zaslow
Role: FSU's Nerf mad scientist
Location: Florida State University
Squad(current): legion of chaos
arms: To be honnest? most of emmn
I like stampedes

My youtube!
http://www.youtube.com/user/skullface1818?feature=mhsn

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Vonpoppm
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2011, 03:38:17 PM »

Please change the name of the sniper class to anything else, there are no snipers and you only encourage the stupid question of, I want to be an awesome sniper guyz how do I do it?". Will consider guide useless and moot until then.
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"The Captain"
Oregon State University Mod
Guard of the Raven Commander
Role - Strategist
Primary: Stampede - Schwere Regen
Sidearms: Maverick - Ira
Awards: Killing an Alpha Z'ed, Best Surviving Squad, The I Just Want a Twinkie Award
Newbs
* Game Organizer

You've got red on you

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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2011, 03:44:52 PM »

How about "long range support" instead of sniper? Tongue
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Loadout
Primary: Berserker, centre barrel rebarrelled to take darts.
Secondary: Rebarrelled Big Salvo to take darts / Barricade (stock).
Sidearm: Badly Well rebarrelled Element (fixed it! Cheesy ).
Markus

Loves Stampedes a little too much

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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2011, 04:14:29 PM »

Changed it to ranger. Any votes for next subject to hit?
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2011, 05:43:53 PM »

I now approve!
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"The Captain"
Oregon State University Mod
Guard of the Raven Commander
Role - Strategist
Primary: Stampede - Schwere Regen
Sidearms: Maverick - Ira
Awards: Killing an Alpha Z'ed, Best Surviving Squad, The I Just Want a Twinkie Award
mcknightchris
* Game Organizer


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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2011, 06:13:31 PM »

Changed it to ranger. Any votes for next subject to hit?

Quartermaster: Not much for fighting, but specializes in carry extra darts and drums/clips to keep the rest of the squad fully loaded. Should stay near the middle of the group to be able to be protected and distribute effectively. Probably should use socks and/or a Recon/Maverick for personal protection.

Also, you should give hybrid classes a try.
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Semi-retired from HvZ due to leaving TAMU. Hopefully I can make it to some missions and invitationals.

Squad: CDC
Rank: Lieutenant

Insanity is just another state of mind... lol
Dandelo
* Game Organizer

Known. Some. Call. Is. Air. Am.

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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2011, 08:02:17 PM »

I really can't apply almost...any of this to the Truman HvZ game.

5 guys enough to challenge a horde? Are you kidding?
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Moderator at Truman State
Markus

Loves Stampedes a little too much

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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2011, 10:19:56 PM »

I really can't apply almost...any of this to the Truman HvZ game.

5 guys enough to challenge a horde? Are you kidding?

Five guys well equipped challenging dispersed hordelets, not the bulk horde, and not for sustained amounts of time. Mainly focusing on operations requiring speed, like getting to a retrieval point or searching for an item. Sieges usually require heavies and large humans anyway. What this is saying is that the five man has a much greater success rate in combat that doesn't involve immediately fleeing.
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solmssteinke


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« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2011, 10:30:45 PM »

I say do the hybrids...I find this very interesting!

~SS "Hawk"~
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Title: Redemptor or "Hawk"
School: SUNY Geneseo

Primary: Nerf longshot modified with replacement springs and removed air restrictor
Secondary: Nerf sword, double-bladed
Dyslexda
* Game Organizer


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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2011, 11:17:11 PM »

I really can't apply almost...any of this to the Truman HvZ game.

5 guys enough to challenge a horde? Are you kidding?

In fairness, while a bit forced and seemingly more for flavor than actual applications (anybody that shoehorns themselves into a dedicated role, rather than flexing to meet the situation at hand is a fool), I can see some obvious parallels. He-Bear and Beardy are heavies, Danger and you (maybe?) are Rangers, Doog and Blitz are Grenadiers, and I pull Scout.

On topic: While it's quite good writing, I'd like to see a clause at the end (or beginning?) stating exactly what I said above: He who puts himself in an ironclad role is a fool and zombie kibble. The best players may have a preference, but know when and how to adapt to a new, needed role.
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Hunting Grounds: Truman State University, Kirksville, MO

The Five Commandments:
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2.) Don't Get It Banned
3.) Don't Be A Dick
4.) Have Fun
5.) Play Like You've Got A Pair
catbarf


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« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2011, 11:22:51 PM »

Our clan has divided our 20-odd members into two squads (Red and Black), subdivided into two 5-man fireteams each (Diamonds, Hearts, Clubs, Spades). The fireteams are composed of a variety of classes, as detailed:

GP (General Purpose)- Longstrikes, Recons, Barricades, Stampedes. Not spectacular in any role, but provide general fire support and cover flanks.
Heavy- Vulcan, Punisher. Heavy, with high volume of fire. They form the core of the squad's firepower, with other members providing support and carrying extra ammunition.
Marksman- Longshot, Spectre. Assigned the role of picking off zombies that stray too close, to prevent the zeds from grouping up close to the fireteam.
PD (Point Defense)- Rapid Fire 20, Tommy 20, Magstrike. High volume of fire but slow to reload. Assigned the role of only firing during charges, using high rate of fire to take out incoming zombies and then reload while covered.

Assault- Spades
1. GP
2. GP, Carries Heavy ammo
3. Heavy
4. Heavy
5. PD, Carries Heavy ammo

Riflemen- Diamonds
1. GP
2. GP, Carries Heavy ammo
3. Heavy
4. Marksman
5. PD

Riflemen- Clubs
1. GP
2. GP, Carries Heavy ammo
3. Heavy
4. Marksman
5. PD

Scout- Hearts
1. GP
2. GP
3. GP
4. GP
5. Marksman

The idea is that each member of the squad has a specific role, and in knowing that role can best help the team. Marksmen are the ONLY people that fire while the zombies are far away, Point Defense ONLY fires when the team is being charged, et cetera. Each Heavy also has a GP or PD assigned to carry spare ammo, helping the Heavy stay mobile by cutting down on the weight of their gear without sacrificing firepower. 5-man teams provide optimal maneuverability, but can be combined into 10-man squads when greater numbers are needed.

To be honest, overly complicated analyses of 'hybrid' classes tend to become more descriptive than prescriptive and so become less useful in assigning roles. I think it's better to stick to well-defined classes and roles based on equipment capabilities and go from there.
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